Archive for January, 2011

Corydoras

January 9, 2011
Corydoras: (Corydoras spp.)

Size: 2-3 inches

Aquarium Size: 10-100 gallons


Corydoras julii is pictured.

Corydoras are an interesting group of cute, active, and cheerful catfish; there are over 130 species identified, and more are being discovered every year. Most of them have very similar care requirements. This article will act as a general guideline.

Many times people buy corydoras to serve as a “cleanup crew” because they feed off the bottom and are good at finding food in little nooks and crannies. However, corydoras cannot live off of just scavenging; they require proper care and feeding just like any other fish in the tank. They are very peaceful and social animals; keep no less than four cories per aquarium. The more the merrier.

Corydoras prefer a pH near neutral and a temperature of 70-80 degrees Fahrenheit. Make sure they have places like rocks and plants to hide around, otherwise they will be stressed. They will eat just about anything including flakes, pellets, algae discs, frozen bloodworms and brine srhimp, as well as live white worms and black worms.  You must ensure that your cories are getting there food. Other tankmates often will eat their food before it reaches the bottom. For that reason, don’t pick tankmates that are too boisterous, and feeding at night often helps.

A word of warning: Corydoras do not tolerate common medications for ich, such as copper-based medications. Cories also don’t like high levels of salt in their water. Fortunately, corydoras aren’t very susceptible to ich due to their bony plating, so just keep the water and gravel clean with frequent water changes and you should be good to go.
Most corydoras can live happily in a 10 gallon tank, but especially considering that they need to be kept in groups, some of the larger species such as the Bronze Corydoras can get a bit crowded.

There is an incredible variety in the species of corydoras, each with their own color pattern. Most of them are very similar in behavior and size, so just a general knowledge of corydoras should suffice. Cories are easy to keep and are very entertaining, as they are social and surprisingly active for catfish. Everybody should give this genus a try at one point or another.

Corydoras aeneus

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